C/O Yoohyun Park

While lacrosse may be a game many Canadians are familiar with, its history often goes unnoticed

In 1994, by the National Sports of Canada Act, lacrosse was officially declared as the national summer sport of Canada. The term lacrosse came about in 1636 when French missionary, Jean de Brebeuf, compared the stick they played with to a bishop’s crozier, or la crosse. However, the game has existed for centuries, originally played by Indigenous tribes across North America, referred to as stickball, The Creator’s Game, Baggataway by the Algonquin and Tewaaraton by the Iroquois, both of which translate to “little brother of war.”

The Creator’s Game was an essential part of Indigenous culture and religion. This name came from the idea that lacrosse was gifted to the people by the Creator, the being responsible for creating everything on earth. As such, the game was used by the Iroquois to teach lessons, for instance, that everyone has struggles and that the key to survival is friends and allies. 

The other name, “little brother of war,” stems from the Iroquois using the game as a way to train young men to be warriors and to settle disputes without going to war. The game could include anywhere between 100 and 1,000 players at a time, playing until the predetermined number of points were achieved by one team. The game was vicious, injuring players with cuts, broken bones and the occasional death

Indigenous lacrosse was played with three to five foot long sticks made of wood and the netting was made of dried out animal hide. Alf Jacques is an Onondaga Turtle Clan lacrosse stick carver. Jacques explains the significance of the wooden stick in an interview with The Equinox. 

“You make that stick from nature. That’s a living piece of wood that you make that out of. The energy of that living tree then transfers to the player,” explained Jacques. 

This fits with the Iroquois culture and belief that, when a man dies, his lacrosse stick is buried with him. The first thing he does when waking up in the afterlife is to take the stick and begin playing. 

However, after the Indigenous people were colonized and assimilated into Canadian culture, so was the game of lacrosse. In 1834, a group from the Caughnawaga tribe demonstrated the game in the city of Montreal. In 1856, Canadian dentist, Dr. William George Beers, founded the Montreal Lacrosse Club and ten years later came up with an adjusted set of rules for the game including a rubber ball and newly designed stick. 

Allan Downey (Dakelh, Nak’azdli Whut’en) is a McMaster professor in the department of history within the Indigenous studies program. His first book, The Creator’s Game: Lacrosse, Identity and Indigenous Nationhood, traces the history of lacrosse in Indigenous communities and demonstrates how lacrosse is an example of the appropriation, then reclamation, of Indigenous identities. 

In his book, Downey describes why he played lacrosse, but also the inherent appropriation he recognized within the game. 

“When I was a kid, I was always told that field lacrosse . . . was a “gentleman’s game,” and we as players would be penalized if we swore. Later, I learned that this dated from an 1860s effort to construct lacrosse as a gendered white middle-class sport for Canadians who were naturalized as gentlemen,”

Allan downey

The book examines the process through which identity is created, articulated and the transformation within Indigenous communities as they continue to play their sport and maintain it as an Indigenous game amongst external and internal challenges. 

While lacrosse is a sport that may sometimes be overlooked in mainstream media, it is important to recognize its Indigenous roots and reflect on how Indigenous culture has shaped the Canadian landscape. There is still much to learn and many inherent biases to recognize and put aside as we work to reconcile the past and create an equitable future. 

After racist tweets by a former Marauder were brought to light, former Mac athletes began to share their stories and the university’s lack of response.

CW: anti-Black racism, police brutality

Since the widespread protests in the United States and globally following the deaths of Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, many professional athletes have taken it upon themselves to further educate others and raise awareness about the acts of racial injustice plaguing their communities, especially those consisting of police brutality; however, this is not new to many athletes this year.

“We found something we’re fighting for as the NBA, as a collective unit…and I use these shoes as a symbol to keep fighting all around the world.”

- Jamal Murray after Denver's Game 6 win. pic.twitter.com/rkwPn9QuHX

— NBA on TNT (@NBAonTNT) August 31, 2020

In 2016, Colin Kaepernick began the movement of kneeling during the national anthem, where he was met with support and anguish. Over the years, Kaepernick became a leading civil rights activist despite being blackballed by team owners for his outspoken views. 

“I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color. To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder,” Kaepernick said in a post-game interview during a 2016-2017 preseason game.

“I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color. To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder.” Kaepernick said in a post-game interview during a 2016-2017 preseason game.

Kaepernick’s statement comes two years after many NBA players made a statement in their games where they wore t-shirts saying, “I Can’t Breathe” following the death of Eric Garner, who repeatedly said those words while being put in a chokehold by police officers. A reminder that those three words were also uttered by Floyd four years later. Likewise to Kaepernick, these athletes still continue to face heavy scrutiny where comments about their salary are made, suggesting that such athletes did not experience systemic racism due to their wealth and financial stability.

Fast forward to 2019, Masai Ujiri was blocked and shoved by the Alameda County sheriff from celebrating with his team due to allegedly not having the correct credentials. A new video released in August 2020 showed otherwise where Ujiri was shoved while having his credentials. The public viewed this incident as a classic case of racial profiling, despite status or wealth being present.

As we look more recently, following the game seven loss by the Toronto Raptors in the 2020 Eastern Conference Semifinals, the public heavily critiqued Pascal Siakam’s play; however, it was brought to our attention that some fans have gone too far and made racial attacks against him.

The aforementioned stories have shined the light on the racism that athletes face consistently but continues to be ignored. As we look more directly at our own community, former lacrosse team player Steven Archachan was only removed from the team (but not from the university) following the revelation of tweets that featured racist slurs. With that being said, Archachan removed himself from the university and stated he would not be attending in the future. Archachan has since apologized for his tweets, while stating to one of our reporters that he was dealing with issues affecting his mental health and well-being at that time.

Kwasi Adu-Poku, a fifth-year kinesiology student at McMaster University and current member of the men’s basketball team, shared his thoughts on the handling of the situation. 

“When they released the article through CBC Hamilton on the situation, when they described [Archachan] choosing to leave the school, it kind of made him seem like the bigger person in the situation and when you think about the scope of what happened, a lot of people were impacted by this message,” Adu-Poku said. “It wasn’t the best thing to let that person paint themselves in that kind of light . . . a lot of us felt there could have been a stronger response at the time but our school is definitely on the trajectory to make a lot of the needed changes and now we’re being held publicly accountable.”

“When they released the article through CBC Hamilton on the situation, when they described [Archachan] choosing to leave the school, it kind of made him seem like the bigger person in the situation and when you think about the scope of what happened, a lot of people were impacted by this message,” Adu-Poku said. “It wasn’t the best thing to let that person paint themselves in that kind of light . . . a lot of us felt there could have been a stronger response at the time but our school is definitely on the trajectory to make a lot of the needed changes and now we’re being held publicly accountable.”

As the case of Archachan began to unfold, former Marauder athletes came forward with their stories. Fabion Foote, a former football player at McMaster, has detailed the systemic racism he faced while on the team. 

“My DL coach at Mac said I had to sell weed to afford my tuition lol. Keep in mind I never smoked in my life. My friend was in a group chat were a white athlete used the N word. My teammate reported it to the coaches and they some how managed to blame us for it,” Foote stated among a series of tweets discussing the systemic racism he endured while at McMaster.

“My DL coach at Mac said I had to sell weed to afford my tuition lol. Keep in mind I never smoked in my life. My friend was in a group chat were a white athlete used the N word. My teammate reported it to the coaches and they some how managed to blame us for it,” Foote stated among a series of tweets discussing the systemic racism he endured while at McMaster.

The racial profiling Foote experienced was echoed by John Williams, a former McMaster athlete who penned a letter via a Google Form, detailing the failures of the university attempting to support the Black and Indigenous community while asking people to support his statement. 

“One former athlete detailed how a certain post practice locker room day of the week was entitled "White Boy Wednesdays" where only "White Music" was allowed to be played. Another athlete spoke about how when the team travelled to Toronto the other white teammates asked them if they were "going to be shot by any of the brothers?" Another Black former female athlete spoke about her feelings of isolation while being on the team and how she felt treated differently by coaches,” wrote Williams.

“One former athlete detailed how a certain post practice locker room day of the week was entitled "White Boy Wednesdays" where only "White Music" was allowed to be played. Another athlete spoke about how when the team travelled to Toronto the other white teammates asked them if they were "going to be shot by any of the brothers?" Another Black former female athlete spoke about her feelings of isolation while being on the team and how she felt treated differently by coaches,” wrote Williams.

Williams also claimed that former Director of Athletics, Glen Grunwald, current Director, Mark Alfano and Dean of Students Sean Van Koughnett did not take action on the issues Black football athletes endured while on the team. 

Following the various critiques, the university announced in July they are conducting a review into the countless experiences of Black athletes and investigating the racism within the department of athletics, which will be headed by Van Koughnett. He aims to hire more Black leaders in the McMaster Athletics department.

Adu-Poku explained to us his appreciation for Van Koughnett’s willingness to work with him and open-ears regarding a discussion about celebrating Black history. Adu-Poku also spoke to non-athletes in the McMaster Black student community and echoed their hopes that this review could act as a blueprint to combat systemic racism in an academic setting.

From Foote’s story to Archachan’s racial slurs, it shows that over the years, racism has never really left the McMaster Athletics department. It was just a matter of time until serious demands for accountability occurred.

Photos C/O Vicky Schindel

By Eamonn Valelly, Contributor 

The McMaster women’s lacrosse team is a strong unit. After speaking to them for just ten minutes, their team chemistry was obvious. The way they carry themselves as a squad and the support they have for one another individually is reflective of how they perform on the field. 

Outside of practice, the team organizes team-bonding activities. For example, this weekend they have scheduled a potluck dinner to discuss their home game on Sunday. The team’s plan is to set goals and get into the game mentality. Keep an eye out on Sunday because you might catch them jamming out for karaoke night at The Snooty Fox. 

The team is very open with each other about what they need to work on and there is no noticeable ego amongst team members. Leadership is fluid, as everyone has the same goal winning the championship this year.

Depending on the day, any player may step up and take the reins. 

“We all really trust each other’s judgment,” said Zoe Collis, a civil engineering student from Orangeville, Ontario. “We all have different strengths in different areas.”

“We really just want to help each other grow,” Kaitlyn Moffat, a second year political science student chimed in.

The relationship the team members have with one other carries into the team's relationship with their coach, Brendan Sweeney. Sweeney is also the head coach of the Hamilton Bengals U19 lacrosse team and multiple athletes from the U19 team have chosen to go to McMaster, in part to continue working with coach Sweeney. 

Sweeney’s role on the team is much greater than just head coach. Always taking the time to check in on his athletes, Sweeney is equally a wealth of knowledge in lacrosse as he is a support system. 

“He really does get to know us as people, it’s more than just player-coach,” Samantha Porter, a second-year kinesiology student from Whitby, Ontario mentions. “Even on the bus he’ll come and sit down with you and ask you how you are. It’s more than just lacrosse, we can go to him about school or life. He’s super passionate about it too, he’s seen Mac at their worst and we’re really starting to build up now. He’s just invested so much time into it.” 

Sweeney was a professor in labour studies at McMaster. He was an undergraduate student at McMaster between 1999 and 2003, where he captained the men’s lacrosse team. He progressed to become one of the assistant coaches on the men’s team after his playing career.

Sweeney recently left his role as director of the McMaster Automotive Research Centre to become the director of management at the Trillium Network for Advanced Manufacturing at Western University. The bond Sweeney has with Mac is evidently strong enough to keep him here coaching the women’s lacrosse team. 

“The women’s [lacrosse] team is barreling towards the championship,” said Fraser Caldwell, the sport information officer for McMaster.

The team agrees with Caldwell. They described themselves as tenacious and swangin’ towards a championship. Make sure to catch the women’s lacrosse team at the Ontario University championship from Oct. 18-20. 

 

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Photo C/O Noah Hoffman

The night of April 2 was the 95th Annual McMaster Athletic Awards Ceremony to celebrate Marauder excellence. The ceremony celebrated McMaster athletes and staff contributions on and off the court over the past year.

The highest honour, the McMaster Athletes of the Year, was awarded to Max Turek (Ivor Wynne Award) of the cross country team, and Linnaea Harper (Therese Quigley Award) of the women’s basketball team. Both led their team to Ontario University Athletics titles, and Harper went one step further, helping bring home the U Sports title for her team.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BvxZ6ElAhq6/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

Graduating seniors Hilary Hanaka, starting guard of the women’s basketball team, and Andrew Richards, men's volleyball’s starting left side, took home the outstanding graduating student-athlete awards, the Dr. Edna Guest and Dr. Ray Johnson Awards, respectively.

Both athletes have displayed outstanding on- and off-court excellence. Richards and Hanaka had already been recognized by U Sports for their community work this season, so it was only fitting that they took home this honour as well.

McMaster's Rookies of the Year award the Mel and Marilyn Hawkrigg Award, was given to lacrosse player Mitch Pellarin and wrestler Ligaya Stinellis. Stinellis captured a silver medal in the 48kg weight class in her first trip to the OUA Championships, and made McMaster history by becoming the first Marauder woman to win the conference’s Rookie of the Year award.

Pellarin ended the season as McMaster’s leading scorer with 19 goals and 11 assists, which was the highest scoring total among rookies in the Canadian University Field Lacrosse Association.

Claudia Continenza, of the women’s soccer team, took home the Les Prince Award for her community service work, and women's hockey president and student therapist Laura Gelowitz won the Bruce Cochrane award for her service to the Athletics Department.

The Joyce Wignall Award, given to a team in recognition of their charitable contributions as a group, was given to the McMaster men’s rugby team for their various charitable efforts throughout the year.

Last night #MarauderNation gathered to celebrate a fantastic year full of great accomplishments by our student-athletes, both on and off the field. Here’s a recap of how the night went down! Thanks to all that attended! 🎉
.
.
.#GoMacGo pic.twitter.com/z8JfEMFShd

— McMaster Marauders (@McMasterSports) April 3, 2019

The night of celebrating excellence was capped off by awarding 51 team MVPs from McMaster's sport teams at the varsity and club level, student-athletes who have competed for four seasons while maintaining good academic standing and coaches who have reached benchmarks in their years of service.

All in all, whether athletes had their their season cut short, or managed to come out on top as provincial or national champions, the annual Awards Ceremony once again rightfully honoured the hard work put in by all the various members of the Marauders athletic community over the past year.

 

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John Bauer

The Silhouette

After a regular season that made lacrosse relevant again at McMaster, the men's lacrosse team knew that they still had a great deal of work to do to be counted among the league's elite. Though the team was the fourth of five seeds in the west and was not expected to go far in the playoffs, Saturday's 13-7 loss to the Guelph Gryphons in the wild card round of the Baggataway Cup stung nonetheless.

Guelph entered the cup hunt ranked fourth in the Canadian University Field Lacrosse Association power rankings, mainly due to their vaunted offensive talent. Their big guns did not disappoint, but the Marauder defense simply could not match the Gryphon attack that seemed to come in waves.

Guelph would open the game by jumping out to generic viagra buy usa a 3-0 lead in just over six minutes of play, with goals from Michael Cavanagh and two of their big three, Jordan Critch and Ryan Serville. Jamie Batten would respond for McMaster, before another Guelph goal capped the scoring for the quarter at 4-1.

The teams would exchange goals for the first eleven minutes of the second quarter, with Marauders goals from Ryan Adams and Alex Goacher. The Gryphons would score two late goals to push the lead to 8-3.

The third quarter would turn chippy, with over ten minutes in penalties handed out. McMaster was given a serious opportunity, spending a good portion of the quarter on the power play, but only managed a single goal with the man advantage. They added an even strength goal by Mitchell Iszkula, but Guelph managed two tallies of their own.

Adams and Iszkula would each notch their second of the game in the fourth, but the story of the quarter was Curtis Knight, one of the Gryphon's players that plays in the National Lacrosse League. He played a factor in all three of Guelph's scores to close the game out at 13-7.

Guelph now moves to the Baggataway Cup quaterfinals to play Bishop's University, while the Maroon and Grey have a long off-season ahead of them. Mac lacrosse fans can take heart that a good majority of the squad still have their peak years left to give to the team, as only four regulars, Mark Phillips, Benjamin Mullholland, Quinton Welychka, and Ian Waud are in their fourth year of eligibility and one, Carter Williams, is in his fifth.

John Bauer

The Silhouette

After a strong start and a disappointing middle to their season, it appears that the McMaster men's lacrosse team is heating up just at the right time. After holding off a furious Laurier compare cialis levitra viagra rally in the dying minutes of their second-to-last game of the season to take the 10-9 win, McMaster officially punched their ticket to the playoffs on Friday night.

After news that Toronto had lost their game filtered through a couple hours later, it was determined that Mac would be the fourth seed. Even though the Maroon dropped their season finale 14-8 to Guelph, the squad is poised to do some damage in the wild card round. Though the cancellation of two of the final regular season games due to rain has muddled the schedule, and the Marauders will not know who their opponent will be until a future date, the men can use the momentum of taking two of their last three games against whichever opponent they face.

Friday's game against Laurier kept McMaster lacrosse fans thoroughly entertained, despite giving them quite the scare. The teams got to a quick start, each picking up a trio of goals in the first quarter. Once again, Mark Phillips was the catalyst for the Marauder’s offense, picking up two of those goals. The teams would swap a pair of goals each in the second, with Phillips notching his third of the game.

McMaster looked to put the game out of reach in the third, as Justin Beatty, Tristan Schram, Ryan Adams and Phillips each potted a goal for the 9-6 lead. But Laurier would not go quietly, as Drew Barfoot scored halfway through the fourth to move the Golden Hawks within two scores. Phillips scored his fifth of the game before Laurier scored two late goals to make things very interesting for Mac's liking. Goaltender Max Yavitt stood tall against the final Laurier barrage to secure the win and the playoff berth. After Phillips, Mitchell Iszkula was Mac's next leading scorer on the day with a goal and three assists.

Although the men would have liked to close out the regular season on a winning note, the Gryphons made sure this did not happen, winning the game with a score of 14-8. The Maroon and Grey played a strong game against the Guelph team, however, but in the end their run wasn’t enough, and the Gryphons prevailed. Phillips once again put up the five-spot, finishing the season with 31 goals on the year, slotting him fifth in the league goal-scoring race. Izskula took his familiar position just behind Phillips on the scoresheet for the day, picking up three points, which was good for thirty on the year.

Once the make up games are played, the Marauders will learn whether they face Western or Guelph in the wild card round this week. The Baggataway Cup final six then gets under way the following week, as Canada's top university teams battle it out from Nov. 1 - Nov. 3.

J.J Bardoel

The Silhouette Intern

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McMaster was able to secure a fourth place finish in the Canadian University Field Lacrosse Association following a victory over Toronto Varsity Blues on Oct. 11, coming through with a 13-7 win.

McMaster was in control for the majority of the first quarter with continuous goals, contributed by Kyle Lindsay and Mitch Iszkula, with assists by Carter Williams. Although Toronto was able to gain some traction, the Marauders followed up with three goals of their own, two of which were from Mark Phillips and another from Iszkula.

McMaster was in the lead by three going into the second quarter, which led to Phillips going on a five-goal streak which carried into the third quarter, only broken by Michael Buwalda of Toronto, who eventually put in four goals that night.

Toronto was able to secure another goal via power play by Justin Crofts. However, McMaster bounced back by capitalizing on power plays of their own with respective goals by Lucas Lepore and Iszkula. Max Yavitt kept the team grounded with solid defence, stopping 27 shots throughout the game.

The Marauders now hold a 4-6 record, and gain solid momentum going into their match with the Laurier Golden Hawks on Oct. 18 on Alumni Field at 7p.m.

John Bauer

The Silhouette

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A season that started with much promise has quickly turned into a nightmare for McMaster's men's lacrosse team after dropping another pair of games. While the losses did come at the hands of the conference leading Brock, the Maroon have not won a game since Sept. 15. An anemic offense continues to plague the team, after they only scored five goals between the two games.

The first game did not start out too badly for McMaster, as the Badgers took a 2-0 lead midway through the first quarter, before Mac's leading scorer Mark Phillips, cut the lead to one. Undisciplined play by the Marauders in the second led to two power play goals against them with an even-strength tally in between to put the Maroon and Grey down 5-1.

While McMaster's defense was strong enough to hold the potent Brock offense to three goals in the second half, their offense was nowhere to be found, despite several power plays in the fourth quarter. The lone goal in the first quarter was all of Mac's offense for the day, and led to an 8-1 loss. Overall, Mac only took eight shots at Badgers goalie Ian Duffy.

The Marauders had three days and a trip to Brock to rethink their strategy. While the style of the teams' second encounter of the week was markedly different, the result was much the same for McMaster

The Marauders entered the game with a decidedly more offensive approach than the first. Brock was more than willing to engage in the run and gun offense however, and quickly built a 5-0 lead in the first quarter. Mac would trade tallies with Brock in the second quarter to work the score to 8-3. Scoring for McMaster was Phillips with his twelfth of the season, who had help from his usual setup men Mitchell Iskzkula and Derrick Hastings.

Similar to the first game, the second half of the contest was all Brock. The balanced Badger attack pumped seven more goals behind the McMaster defense before Phillips scored late for a 15-4 final. McMaster almost matched Brock in shots, but the Brock defense severely limited the quality of McMaster's scoring opportunities.

McMaster looks to right the ship this coming week with a single game against the Toronto Varsity Blues on Oct. 11 at Alumni Field. A win for McMaster would move them even with Toronto in the standings at 6 points, though Mac has a game in hand.

John Bauer

The Silhouette

At the midway point of the campaign, the promising start to the season has all but evaporated for the McMaster men's lacrosse team after a tough loss to the Guelph Gryphons. They now have six games left to show that lacrosse matters at McMaster.

The game in Guelph on Sept. 25 was a special teams feast. The teams combined for nine power play goals in the Gryphon's 14-9 win. Guelph opened the scoring just over seven minutes into the game on an individual effort by Michael Cavanagh. The Marauders would then score two power play goals in quick succession, compliments of Mark Phillips and Carter Williams, only to have Guelph tie the game exactly four minutes later.

The Gryphons' Connor Deuchars would begin to take over the game early in the second quarter. He would score a minute in, and add two more before the half, sandwiching another Guelph goal and two McMaster markers by Williams and Ryan Adams. Mark Phillips would score his second tally with the man advantage after Deuchar's third goal, bringing the score to 6-5 in Guelph's favor after 40.

Only a second after play resumed to start the second half, Williams would score to tie the game.  That brief second was the best the Marauders played in the third, as Guelph would carry the play and respond with three goals.

Down 9-6, McMaster started the comeback just over a minute into the fourth with Alex Goacher's first goal of the season. Just ten seconds later, Taylor Brown put a dagger in Mac's hearts with an unassisted tally. The teams would swap goals for the next eighteen minutes leading to the 14-9 final.

Williams would finish with four goals for the Maroon and Phillips would finish with two of his own. Guelph's Deuchars was a Marauder killer with five markers, while Jordan Critch set up six and scored one of his own.

A busy week lies ahead for the Marauders. Brocks pays a visit to Alumni field on Oct. 2 and the Maroon then take Highway 6 West to visit Laurier on Oct. 4, before a trip in the other direction for a tilt on Oct. 6 against Brock in St. Catharine’s.

John Bauer

The Silhouette

After a strong start to the season, it appears that McMaster's men's lacrosse team has come back to earth. The men opened the season 2-1 with wins over the University of Toronto Varsity Blues and the Laurentian Voyageurs, but dropped to 2-3 this week after consecutive losses to Western and Laurentian.

After two games and two blowout losses against Western in this young season, it seems that the Mustangs simply have the Marauders' number. The 12-1 Friday onslaught could have been worse, as goaltender Max Yavitt faced thirty shots, compared to the Western goaltending duo's seven. Mac's lone goal came from Mitchell Iszukla, while Ryan McCrory led the way for Western with a four-goal outing.

With less than twenty-four hours and a trip to Sudbury to regroup before their next game, the Maroon were looking to quickly put the Western loss behind them against the Voyageurs, whom they had bested 9-8 last week. Unfortunately, after a heartbreaking 11-8 overtime loss, it seems that the teams are evenly matched, with home field advantage being the deciding factor.

Laurentian jumped out to an early lead with a goal by Phillip Romanet just under seven minutes into the game. Iszukla would respond on the power play, giving him two goals in two games. Romanet would score two quick power play goals to complete the first quarter hat trick before Marauders Mark Phillips and Derrick Hastings evened the score in the second quarter. The Voyageurs rounded out the scoring for the half with three late goals to take a 6-3 lead.

Mark Phillips would lead a third quarter McMaster attack, picking up two of three Marauder goals book-ending a lone Laurentian goal to move within one goal of the tie.

Early in the fourth quarter Justin Beatty and Phillips would temporarily put the Maroon ahead 8-7, before a late goal by Voyageur Matt Volpe sent the game to an extra period.

The offense that had come so easily for McMaster earlier in the game abandoned them as they failed to respond to three Laurentian overtime goals for an 11-8 final. Phillips and Iszukla led the offense for Mac with matching four point afternoon totals.

The coming week takes the Marauders to Guelph, Ont. whom they trail by one win in the standings. The men then get a full week break, returning home Oct. 2 to play Brock.

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